ISO/IEC 13818 Specifications for MPEG-2, or “Generic Coding of Moving Pictures and Associated Audio Information”

ISO IEC 13818 MPEG 2 Coding

Originally introduced in the mid-Nineties and replacing the original MPEG suite (deriving from the Motion Picture Experts Group) in 1999, MPEG-2 is the standard for the “generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information.” As a digital video standard, it is used for DVDs and television video broadcast. In fact, it is the most widely used codec for broadcast.

DVD and ATSC (Advanced Television Systems Committee) video is based on MPEG-2, which refers to video files with TS, VOB, MPG, and SVCD extensions. Prepared and drafted by the International Telecommunications Union’s Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T) and adopted by the Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC JTC 1, ISO/IEC 13818 specifies the MPEG-2 format, and it currently consists of ten parts.

The first three parts of the international standard cover the system layer, video coding scheme, and coded representation of the audio, respectively. The other documents each cover a significant component of the coding. Notably, Part Seven details advanced audio coding (AAC).

All parts of the ISO/IEC 13818 standard are listed below. As these documents need to remain current with the industry they serve, please note that there are numerous amendments and corrigenda to some of the current editions. Amendments alter materials in the existing standards, and corrigenda repair editorial errors in existing standards.

ISO/IEC 13818-1:2018 – Information technology – Generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information – Part 1: Systems

ISO/IEC 13818-2:2013 – Information technology – Generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information – Part 2: Video

ISO/IEC 13818-3:1998 – Information technology – Generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information – Part 3: Audio

ISO/IEC 13818-4:2004 – Information technology – Generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information – Part 4: Conformance testing

This standard has three corrigendum documents: Cor1:2007, Cor2:2011, and Cor3:2012.

It also has three amendments: Amd1:2005, Amd2:2005 (this amendment has two corrigenda: Amd2/Cor1:2007 and Amd2/Cor2:2009), and Amd3:2009.

ISO/IEC TR 13818-5:2005 – Information technology – Generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information – Part 5: Software simulation (this is a technical report, not a standard)

ISO/IEC 13818-6:1998 – Information technology – Generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information – Part 6: Extensions for DSM-CC

This standard has two corrigendum documents: Cor1:1999 and Cor2:2002.

It also has three amendments: Amd1:2000 (this amendment has a corrigendum: Amd1/Cor1:2002), Amd2:2000, and Amd3:2001.

ISO/IEC 13818-7:2006 – Information technology – Generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information – Part 7: Advanced Audio Coding (AAC)

This standard has two corrigendum documents: Cor1:2009 and Cor2:2010.

It also has an amendment: Amd1:2007.

Part Eight covered 10-bit video extension, but it has been withdrawn due to lack of industry interest.

ISO/IEC 13818-9:1996 – Information technology – Generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information – Part 9: Extension for real time interface for systems decoders

ISO/IEC 13818-10:1999 – Information technology — Generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information — Part 10: Conformance extensions for Digital Storage Media Command and Control (DSM-CC)

ISO/IEC 13818-11:2004 – Information technology – Generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information – Part 11: IPMP on MPEG-2 systems

Parts One through Three of the MPEG-2 standard, or the “generic coding of moving pictures and audio information,” is available as ISO/IEC 13818 Information technology – Generic Coding of Moving Pictures and Audio Information Package (Parts 1 – 3).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.