ISO 10958— Snowboards Binding Mounting Area

Athlete jumping with snowboarding on a snowy mountain in the winter with her bindings adhering to ISO 10958-1:1998  and ISO 10958-2:2015.

A snowboard is made up of three primary components: snowboard, boots, and the bindings. The bindings maximize control, comfort, and precision as they deliver power from your body, legs, and feet into the board. A good pair of bindings enables you to control a snowboard with ease, keeping your feet comfortable and absorbing vibrations. ISO 10958-1:1998— Snowboards — Binding Mounting Area — Part 1: Requirements And Test Methods For Snowboards Without Inserts and ISO 10958-2:2015— Snowboards – Binding Mounting Area – Part 2: Requirements And Test Methods For Snowboards With Inserts provide specifications for the binding mounting area for snowboards.

What Is ISO 10958?

ISO 10958 consists of the following parts, under the general title Snowboards — Binding mounting area:

  • Part 1: Requirements and test methods for snowboards without inserts
  • Part 2: Requirements and test methods for snowboards with inserts

The standards define an insert as a “reusable commonly threaded attachment point permanently fixed in the snowboard at the time of manufacture, used to mount the bindings to the snowboard and typically arranged in a pattern corresponding to a particular binding manufacturer’s pattern.” Both ISO 10958-1:1998  and ISO 10958-2:2015 contain data for the manufacturer of snowboards, bindings and retention devices concerning dimensions, tests, and other specifications for the binding mounting area.

What Is ISO 10958-1?

ISO 10958-1:1998 specifies requirements and test methods for binding mounting areas, bindings, and retention devices of snowboards without inserts for adults or juveniles, in order to optimize the compatibility of the functional unit “snowboard-binding-boot.” It provides strength requirements of binding mounting area as well as specifications of the binding and retention devices. The standard’s test procedure contains a stripping resistance test and a pull-out test.

What Is ISO 10958-2?

ISO 10958-2:2015 specifies requirements and test methods for snowboards as sports equipment on which bindings are attached by means of inserts that are not removable and screws. It details specifications for the design and strength requirements of snowboard inserts. The standard’s test procedure evaluates both retention-strength and spin resistance.

Anatomy of Snowboard Bindings

There are several components that make snowboard bindings:

  • Buckles: guarantee a secure closure of your binding.
  • Highback: is the vertical plate behind your lower calf that provide support throughout the turns and transfer your energy to the board.  
  • Heel cup: are the metal or plastic loops at the base of the highback (they are not connected), helping to holds your boot in the binding and transfer power into the baseplate.
  • Chassis: is the soul of your binding. It is main piece and the actual connection with the board.
  •  Footbed: acts as cushioning for impacts and the contour of the footbed matches boot profiles, creating a better fit.
  • Straps: features two straps, in most cases, which are the toe strap and the ankle strap.

How to Choose Snowboard Bindings

When choosing snowboard bindings, it is important to consider the flex, type of binding, and compatibility with your board. The flex of snowboard boots refers to the amount of support it provides and how quickly it transfers energy to your board. Soft boots and stiff bindings will work against each other, so finding boots and bindings with similar flexes is recommended. Further,the flex of snowboard bindings should be appropriate to your ability level, complement the terrain you ride, and match the flex in your boots.

Beginners and freestylers tend to choose bindings with short, flexible highbacks for a softer, forgiving ride and easy recovery when landing jumps and tricks. While, advanced riders and freeriders typically prefer bindings with tall, stiff highbacks for precise control at high speeds, in deep powder and on steep terrain. Most people, however, will fall somewhere in the middle with medium flex bindings that offer balanced all-mountain performance. Ultimately, your choice of snowboard bindings can be narrowed based on the following riding styles:

  • All-mountain: bindings vary based on your skill level and preferred terrain (groomed runs, powder, park and pipe, etc.). Most riders choose soft to medium flex, while racers choose stiff flex.
  • Freestyle: bindings offer soft flex for greater turning ease and maneuverability and is ideal for jumps, spins, tricks, and park features such as half-pipe, rails, and boxes.
  • Freeride and Splitboard: bindings are stiffer for greater control and are best for unmarked backcountry and side country terrain.
  • Powder: Bindings are stiffer for greater control on wider, longer boards that float in deep powder.

ISO 10958-1:1998— Snowboards — Binding Mounting Area — Part 1: Requirements And Test Methods For Snowboards Without Inserts is ­­available on the ANSI Webstore.

ISO 10958-2:2015— Snowboards – Binding Mounting Area – Part 2: Requirements And Test Methods For Snowboards With Inserts is available on the ANSI Webstore.

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